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Destler Dodge

"Adult Player" is its name and sheer embarrassment is its game. 

While talking about one's masturbatory habits can be a taboo subject for many to discuss publicly, the lucky users who have downloaded the new porn-watching app, "Adult Player," now have no choice but to air their dirty laundry all over the internet. While "ransomware" isn't a new craze by any means, the rapidly increasing popularity of smartphones and app-technology has allowed new venues for it to thrive in.

How It Works 

Ransomware is a type of malware virus that locks users out of their devices (computers, phones, etc.), and forces them to pay a "ransom" in order to regain access to them. While awareness toward the typical red flags that surround ransomware scams has grown over the years, it is still something that plenty of people find themselves falling victim to. 

Unfortunately, as technology has advanced, so has this type of software. Ransomware creators and manufacturers have managed to make ransomware spreadable through removable USB drives, messaging services and phone apps. Not only does ransomware take over your device and files but it can take passwords on any account, even restricted ones. Everything from photos and videos to personal records and information are up for grabs.

How "Adult Player" Joins The Game 

Essentially, "Adult Player" isn't actually a porn-watching app; it's just disguised as one. It operates as a PornHub-esque pornography-streaming service that dupes its users into thinking they're about to watch some live action. The creators of this software had the brilliant idea of concealing it into an app that involves something no one talks about doing but most people actually do -- look at porn. Genius. 

As if it isn't bad enough that this virus takes control of every piece of information on the appliances you hold nearest and dearest to you, the extortion fee it asks you to pay is no joke. Frustrating beyond belief and picky to boot, it requests that you give them the money using only PayPal gift cards -- around $500, to be exact -- stopping you right in your tracks of getting on with your alone time. You are left feeling unsatisfied and having your pockets emptier when you pick your pants up than when you pulled them down. 

So now not only are you feeling discontented and ashamed as this virus takes the life of your phone, it manages to snap a picture of you as well. This is for cruel entertainment purposes, instilling the fear that your confused/embarrassed selfie is now floating through cyber space and to let you know what you look like while you're having a panic attack. 

Not to worry, because once you pay the fee that seems more like a bribe in the attempts for whoever is on the other side of this virus to keep their mouths shut, you can easily look up online how to never let the app hack into your phone again. This begins with"rebooting 'safe mode,' and then clicking on 'settings,' then 'security,' then 'device administrator,' then deactivating the 'Adult Player' app. After, go into 'settings,' then 'apps,' and uninstall 'Adult Player,'" explains the cybersecurity firm Zscaler to CNN.

The Moral Of The Story 

Don't download sketchy porn apps on your phone because there is a slim chance that you are actually being hacked by some crazy, technologically advanced software that takes a selfie just to embarrass you a little more, locks your phone, then empties your pockets by demanding an extortion fee just to unlock the information on the phone you had beforehand. Also, because of the internet and the sophistication of this ridiculous hacking software, you never really know where that selfie will go.